Notes


Matches 151 to 200 of 2,021

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 #   Notes   Linked to 
151 1910 Census, Indiana, Benton, Oak Grove Twp., p1B#20
Smith, Paul head, make, white, 25, married(1) 0, IN,IN,IN, english, farmer, gen. farm, rented
Fannie, wife, white, female, 32, married (1), 0,0,0,IN,IN,IN no occ.
- - - - - - - - - - -
1920 Census Indiana, Benton, Oxford Town, ed 7th. sheet 9B, #276
Smith, Paul E. head,own home, mortgaged, male, white, 34, married, read and write, IN, IN,IN,
speak english, plumber, in shop, own account
Fannie A. wife, female, 42, married, read, write, IN,IN,IN speak english, unreadable occ, in house
- - - - - - - - - -
1930 Census, Indiana, Benton, Oxford Town, ed 4-10, sheet 2B
Howard Street #64,66
Smith, Paul E. head, owned, 1000, radio, not a farm, male, white, 46, married, 25, no school, yes
read and write, IN,IN,IN , speak english, Plumbing, no veteran
Fannie wife, female, white, 63, married, age at marriage not marked, no school, yes read and write,
IN,IN,IN, no occ.
Robert, son, male, white, 7, single, yes school, yes read write, IN,IN,IN no occ.
- - - - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - - - - 
Smith, Paul E. (I4343)
 
152 1910 Census: Rochester, Fulton, IN
Frank Wales, 40, married once for 12 years
Mary, 30, married once for 12 years, 5 children, 4 living
Carry R., 11
Ernest W., 7
Ora, 4
Jennie, 2

1920 Census: Rochester, Fulton, IN
Frank Waler, 49, IN
Mary, 39, IN
Ernest W., 17
Ora, 14
Jennie T., 11
Rida M, dau, 5

Wednesday, January 6, 1926: An echo of the suicide of the late John BISHER, a farmer of near Loyal on January 21, 1925, was sounded in the Fulton circuit court Wednesday in a claim filed against the estate of the deceased by Oscar MONESMITH for $85. Bisher, after a day in the Fulton circuit court in which much damaging evidence was introduced against him in a damage suit for malicious prosecution filed by Elmer MONESMITH, went home and shot himself, leaving a note in which he stated that lies told by neighbors on the witness stand was the cause of the rash act. As an item in this claim, Mr. Monesmith included a charge of $12 for driving Bisher in his car while he was procuring witnesses to testify in his behalf. Two other claims were also filed against Bisher estate Wednesday by neighbors who cared for the dead man's stock and guarded the premises for 21 days following his death. These claimes were filed by Dewey CRABILL, who seeks a judgment for $52.50 and Ora WALES one for $31.50

Monday, September 11, 1978 Ora WALES, 73, Middleton, a former Rochester resident, died Sunday in a Richmond hospital. He was born June 24, 1905 in Rochester to Frank and Mary [MILLISER] WALES. He was married to Vivian ROBBINS, who survives. Surviving with the wife are a daughter, Mrs. Carol MASSIE, Pinellas Park, Fla. a son Ken WALES, Green Cove Springs, Fla.; two grandchildren; three sisters, Mrs. Carrie SIXBEY, Rochester; Mrs. Jennie WOLFE, Frankfort, and Mrs. Ada NEHER, New Paris, Texas. Graveside services will be at 11 a.m. Wednesday at the I.O.O.F. cemetery, Rochester. Friends may call at the Foster & Good funeral home from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday. 
Wales, Ora (I3663)
 
153 1920 census link
http://www.ancestry.com/search/io/browse.aspx?c=3&state=Indiana&county=Grant&township=Marion&ed=100&roll=T625_434&STAbrv=IN&startimg=1125&endimg=1159&rp=1150&hash=501532831&width=2641&height=1893&levels=5&colorspace=Grayscale 
Bishir, Joseph William (I4341)
 
154 1920 Michigan, Midland Co. Midland City page 3a

Fradenburgh, John, head, m,w,56,married, read, write English, Ind, United States, United States
Machinist, (looks like chevrolet plant, chemical plant, the Ch is plain, the rest is smooshed)
Olivia wife, f,w,61,married, read, write English, Ind, Ind, Ind, no occ.
Gillam, Eli, brother in law, m,w,55widowed, no read or write, Ind, Ind,Ind, no occ.

Info on names and dates on this line from Bertha Charlton, her grandson is a g grandson of Sarah Emily Fradenburg and John Bennet Charlton I. 
Fradenburgh, John E (I4338)
 
155 1930 Benton Co., Oak Grove Twp., Oxford[bishir3.FTW] living with her daughter Mattie.

Angeline's step-father's surname was Sutton. 
Denman, Angeline Sutton (I4330)
 
156 1930 census link
http://content.ancestry.com/iexec/?htx=View&r=an&dbid=6224&iid=ORT626_1947-0559


obit-
Elmer Miller Dies at Age of 68
Elmer Miller, 68, a resident of the Albany area since 1905, died of a heart attack Thursday afternoon in his farm home on Rt. 2, Albany.
Mr. Miller was born Feb 26, 1891, in Dayville, Ore. He lived in San Francisco and at Hillsboro before coming to Albany the age of 14.
In 1917 he married the former Mabel Cox, who died last February. He was a member of Grand Prairie Grange and Albany Elks lodge.
Survivors include 2 sons, Earl and William Miller, both of Rt. 1 Albany; and two daughters, Mrs. Helen Towery of Rt. 1 Albany and Mrs. Marjorie McEachern of Rt. 3 Albany, and 11 grandchildren.
The Rev. Morton Booth will officiate at funeral services at 1:30 p.m. Monday in the Fisher Funeral home. Elks ritualistic rites will be given at Willamette Memorial Park. 
Miller, Elmer (I4354)
 
157 2 children. Victoria (I3221)
 
158 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I5350)
 
159 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I5382)
 
160 3 living children. Brooks, ? (I5279)
 
161 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I591)
 
162 Hardesty, Eliza Ann (I574)
 
163 A "Anna Bisher" appears in the 1880 census aged 25 as a servant to W. P. Martin in Monroe, Jasper Co., Iowa. Anna is widowed by 1920, still living in Monroe, IA in 1925 and 1930 censuses. Bisher, Roxanne “Anna” (I2432)
 
164 A "Gentleman of Lambeth Marsh" Whitney, Thomas (I1011)
 
165 A biography of John Lee Jr. published in the late 1800s indicates that his grandfather was Joel Lee Sr., b. 1756, a Revolutionary War soldier and that the family was from Richmond, VA. However, John’s marriage record indicates that his father was William and that they were married in Halifax, VA.

William Lee bought land in 1785 in Halifax Co., Virginia on Hunting Creek, which is in the northern part of the county. (There was another William Lee with land in the south district of Halifax Co., who also had a son named William.)

From an 1810 Virginia Personal Property Tax list for Patrick Co. and other tax lists, it appears that the family was living in Patrick Co. by 1809 and were gone by 1817.

1815 Virginia Directory of Landowners:

Lee, John Russells Ck 7SE
Lee, William, Senior, William Lee Junior, and Joel Lee; Russells Ck 6S
Lee, Abel; headwater Jacks Ck; 17N
Lee, Laurence; Wards Gap; 35W (this would be on the Blue Ridge)
Lee, Rowland; Smiths Rv; --
Lee, William; Smiths RV; 20 N 
Lee, William Sr. (I7669)
 
166 A birth record exists for John Lee in Missouri for 1841 - father: Washington Lee and mother Amanda. Census records would seem to confirm this is, indeed, our John.
John spent the first four years of his life on the farm in Missouri then was brought in a covered wagon across the Oregon Trail to Oregon Territory. There his father acquired land where they farmed and several of John’s brothers and sisters were born. The family then packed up and went south into California. As a young man living with his family, John was in Cache Creek Twp., Yolo Co., California in the 1860 census. Still with his family in 1870, he was listed as single living on their farm in Farmersville, Tulare Co., California. Also residing in Tulare Co. was a young woman, Mary Ann (Molly) Brown of Texas. The two were married about 1870, probably in Tulare Co., but we have not found a record of the marriage. In 1871 their first child, Rose, was born in “Long Pine” or possibly Lone Pine, California. The couple remained together and had four more children: Clara, Robert, Edward, and Lucy. But by 1880 they had separated and Mary was living in the household of her brother-in-law, John’s younger brother, Joseph Christopher Lee. Joe and Molly appear in the 1880 census in Castroville, Monterey County, California along with John and Molly’s children, Joe’s nieces and nephews. We cannot find John Lee in the 1880 census however there is a John Harvey Lee and William Jasper Lee, born in Missouri, listed as farmers in Santa Maria, Santa Barbara Co., in the 1879 Great Register of Voters.

In November 1882 John Harvey Lee became one of the founders of the town of Santa Ynez in Santa Barbara Co., California. He purchased a lot from the Catholic Church in the town and he appears to also have had land in the Happy Canyon area nearby. While interviewing Mrs. Jeanette Lyons of the Santa Ynez Historical Society in the 1970s she recalled her father talking about John Lee. Her father had told her that John Lee had shown up in Happy Canyon telling the story that he used to have a wife but that he had traded her for a horse and saddle. She remembered him vaguely as being a tall, thin man.

Joanne Rife in her book, Where the Light Turns Gold, The Story of the Santa Ynez Valley, 1977 says, “John Lee’s Sagunto Street livery, with its row of chairs in front, was a center for town gossip.”

John Lee is also mentioned in the journal kept by Edgar Davidson (brother-in-law of Jeanette Lyons) and the first Forest Ranger in what would become the Los Padres National Forest. Davidson refers to numerous visits with Lee and wife in the Happy Canyon and White Rock areas during the years 1905-1908 and remarks that John Lee also delivered mail into the backcountry. At one point he writes that he helped the Lees with an ailing cow and they frequently exchanged visits.

John is listed in the Great Register of Voters for Santa Barbara Co. in 1890 and purchased government land there in 1891. He appears in the 1897 voting register for Santa Ynez, Santa Barbara County, occupation barber. In Santa Ynez he met the daughter of Elizabeth A. Greer. E.A. Greer was well known in Santa Ynez. She owned a boarding house, general store and restaurant on Sagunto Street at the center of the booming town. Elizabeth’s oldest daughter, Mary Catherine (May) had divorced her Irish husband, James Kane, with whom she had five children: Daniel, Mabel J., Charles H., Ardella, and John. In November 1892 John Lee married Mary Catherine. There is a newspaper announcement of their marriage in the Los Angeles Times on 18 November 1892. They are listed as residents of Calabasas. They appear in the 1900 census in Santa Ynez with her children and their own two boys: George Frederick (Buck) Lee and Harry E. Lee. Jeanette Lyons remembered the Lee brothers Buck and Harry. The Santa Ynez Historical Society has in their digital archives a photo of Harry E. Lee in his school baseball uniform dated 1910. They also have photos of the school the Lee boys attended … and confessed to burning down. The school was built in 1896 and burned in 1908. The available information points toward a prank gone wrong, a small fire set on the front porch of the school, which got out of hand and resulted in the complete destruction of the building (Joanne Rife, p. 70-71). The Lee boys and an accomplice later “fessed up” to the deed. (Mable Kane Scrapbook)

John Lee’s second marriage also ended in divorce. By the time the 1910 census was taken he was living alone, still in Santa Ynez. His wife May, Mary Catherine Beadle Greer Kane Lee, had married for a third time and was living in San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County with her new husband, Frank Davidson, and her two Lee sons. She and her son Buck spent the remainder of their lives there. We have not yet been able to trace son Harry beyond the 1920 census.

John continued to live alone in Santa Ynez and appears in the 1920 census there. In 1922 he became ill and we can surmise that he went down to Los Angeles to be near some of his grown children and nieces and nephews. His brother Joe and wife Molly were deceased, his remaining brother, Bill, was living with their nephew Fred Lee. John succumbed to heart disease and died there. He was buried in the same cemetery as his first wife, Molly Brown Lee, and her 2nd husband, John’s brother, Joe Lee, and later their brother Bill would be buried there too. We know that this extended family remained close thanks to a scrapbook in the Santa Ynez Historical Society’s library. John Harvey Lee’s step-daughter, Mabel J. Kane, kept clippings about her family over many years and when her mother married John Lee she included news items about their children along with his children from his first marriage. She pasted them all into a large book that her daughter donated to the historical society. So even though John “traded” Molly away for a horse and saddle we now know that they remained close and in touch over the years.

John Lee started out in Missouri, traveled by wagon across the American wilderness as a toddler, farmed in the Columbia River Valley in the Oregon Territory, the Sacramento Valley, and the San Joaquin Valley in California. He claimed land in the Santa Ynez Valley where he owned a livery stable during the boom there in the 1880s. He married two women named Mary and was divorced from both. He had seven children, four boys and three girls. He was described as tall and thin. Judging by the yarn he told upon his appearance in Santa Ynez, that he had traded his wife away for a horse and saddle, and the accounts that his livery stable was a center of town gossip, one can assume that John Harvey Lee enjoyed and probably told a pretty good story…

Carley Bisher Worth, www.bishir.org/gen

RESEARCH:

John was in Cache Creek Twp., Yolo Co., California in 1860. In 1870 he was listed as single in Farmersville, Tulare Co., California. He is listed in the Great Register for Santa Barbara Co. in 1890 and purchased government land in 1891 there. He appears in the 1897 voting register for Santa Ynez as a barber and in 1900 with a new wife, Mary, and two new children. John was divorced again and living alone in 1910 and 1920 in Santa Ynez, California. A local history of Santa Ynez indicates that John ran a Livery Stable on Segunto St. as well. John died of arteriosclerosis.

John's death certificate indicates he was in California for almost all of his life (93 years) although his brother, Joseph's, shows 19 years - both are probably incorrect. Even though his death certificate would indicate a birth year of 1821, a birth record exists for a John Lee in Missouri for 1841 - Father: Washington Lee (George W. Lee?) and Mother: Amanda. Census records would seem to confirm this is, indeed, our John.

John H. Lee is not in the Great Register of Voters for 1877, Santa Barbara County.

------------------

9 April 1978
Santa Ynez Valley Historical Society Museum
Santa Ynez, California

Conversation with Miss Jeanette Lyons
John Lee: When she first heard of him he had taken up residence in Happy Canyon. She remembered him vaguely as being a tall, thin man. Most of what she knew about him came from her own father. He was married first to a lady who, so the story goes, he traded away for a horse and saddle. He later married Adella? Greer [actually Mary Greer] who came to Santa Ynez in a covered wagon. Her husband died en route in Nevada. She opened a dance hall and restaurant where parties went on until 4 in the morning. Miss Lyons was not allowed to attend these. But she did attend many other social functions there including graduations and a “rained out” picnic held on the floor. Mrs. Greer was married before or later to Mr. John Caine, they had a son, Danny.

Miss Lyons remembers John Lee’s sons, probably by a marriage before Mrs. Greer, Harry Lee and Buck Lee. She may have info or pictures of them in her scrapbook.

Mrs. Greer and Mr. Grear had a daughter who married a local saddle maker – John ?. Mrs. Greer’s restaurant was where the filling station (across from museum) is now.

She suggested that John Lee might be buried in old Oak Hill Cemetery near Miss Lyons home in Ballard. She thinks Mrs. Greer was Catholic so that he may have been buried at Santa Ynez Mission.

She also suggested that we check the College Hotel Register in the museum for Lees – since many traveling entertainment groups stayed there.

She remembered that the three original buildings in Santa Ynez were 1) the liquor store, 2) Murphy’s Mercantile, and 3) one at the end of the block she couldn’t remember.

The other lady we spoke to was Mrs. Barranco (or “o”) she’s in the telephone book (her son is a doctor). Mrs. Mary Dareage is the “guiding spirit” of the museum. She did the plantings in the court yard.

Note: Mrs. Lyons also said that John Lee was a Barber.

Mrs. Lyons’ father, Edgar Davison, wrote a journal when he worked for the forest service. He knew Joseph or john Lee as he mentions a Lee that came into the back country to bring mail.  He had dinner with Lee and his wife (never mentions wife's name), help Lee's wife with a cow in White Rock etc. 
Lee, John Harvey (I1711)
 
167 A Catharine Bysher appears in Bedminster, Bucks, PA in 1860 as a widow living with Tobias Trouthamel. Catharine (I5594)
 
168 A Clarence E. Bisher served as a private in Company H, 1st Infantry Regiment, South Dakota Volunteers in the Spanish American War from 27, May 11, 1898 to October 5, 1899.

The family was living in Ekalaka, Carter Co., Montana. 
Bisher, Clarence Everett (I2679)
 
169 A Elle L. Spurgeon was living with them in 1880 in Colusa. Elle Lee? There is a Lucius Booth Spurgen registered to vote in Winters, Yolo Co., California in 1890.

Obituary Woodland Democrat, Aug 18, 1922
Pioneer Rancher To Be Laid to Rest Here Sunday

Services for Lucius B. Spurgeon, who died at Arbuckle yesterday afternoon and who was the father of Mrs. P.T. Foster of Zamora, will be held at the home of J.D. Harling, at the corner of College and Cross streets here Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. The interment will be in the Woodland cemetery.

Spurgeon suffered a paralytic stroke last July 31. He was driving an automobile near Sacramento at the time, but escaped injuries despite the loss of control of the machine. Deceased was 68 years of age, a native of El Dorado county. He had farmed in Yolo and Colusa counties. For twenty years he was located in the Madison district, but of late has been residing in retirement near Winters.

Spurgeon leaves a wife, the former Mary B. Ely, whom he married in 1875, and one son and a daughter, James F. Spurgeon of Roseville and Mrs. Mary Ellen Foster of Zamora. Lucius B. Spurgeon, another son, died at Fort George Wright, Washington, in 1918, after he had taken up the colors of Uncle Sam.

Mrs. California Campbell of San Francisco is the only living sister of the deceased.

There are nine surviving grand-children: Lucius S., John T., Percy T., Ima Mae, and Lovus B. Foster, all of Zamora: and Faris Wayne Spurgeon of San Francisco. The latter is the son of Lucius Spurgeon, deceased service man. 
Spurgeon, Lucius Booth (I8364)
 
170 A family rumor has it that Thomas Mendenhall's mother had a farm in Greenwood, AK. When she sold it they mined coal & industrial diamonds there. Thomas had a farm near Ft. Smith, AK. He moved to Los Angeles in the late 1880's and had a dairy on Macy St. (near the current freeway.) (Arkansas family says Tom sold his farm to his older brother, John Robert, and that it was called the "lower 80 acres" or "old home place.") After his wife's death he never remarried. Thomas homesteaded a ranch in Las Virgines Canyon where Tapia Park is now. On it, he and Frank built "Brent's Mountain Craig", which was a resort camp or dude ranch. Much of the land is now Malibu Creek State Park. Ray Mendenhall spent a lot of time with his grandfather and remembers him frying onion rings and potatoes for him. (He told Ray he had an engineering degree and that he was born and educated in Germany and left Germany during a purge of Meninites - this may relate to the Harkey ancestry somehow. He also told Ray he could speak seven languages without an accent.) Thomas baby-sat for his son, Frank, and cooked with Frank and Carrie went out. He was very nice, according to Ray. "Very much like his son, Frank. A little stronger headed, quicker temper. He never swore though. When he said 'By doggies!' he was swearing. When he had said 'By doggies' three times - watch out!" Ray quotes him as follows: "By doggies, you better stop doing that!", pause, "By doggies, I told you to stop doing that!", pause, "By doggies!" ... WHAM! He was very short and very strong and tough. He was very smart: nobody could outspell him and he was very quick with "figures." Ray's story about his "Paw" (his name for his grandfather): One time Frank bought a sorrell horse for Fred (light red body and a dark red mane) at Alameda and Slauson/Mateo at a horse barn. It kicked in the front of the wagon. The horse kicked the hat off Thomas' head and he just kept beating it. He was mad because it was ruining his wagon. If the horse had hit him it would have killed him. Ray saw it and yelled, "Paw, don't do that! Let's stop! That horse doesn't have any sense! Paw!" Then, finally, Tom stopped. Then Frank came out and Tom said, "By doggies, Frank, we're gonna have to get rid of that horse. I can't work with him." Tom could almost always communicate with animals, but not this one. It had been eating loco weed. (They ended up making it into dog food.) In later years Thomas lived on 1st Street near the corner of Sunset Blvd. east of Western in Hollywood where Fox Studios is (Sorrano St.?) His pet granddaughter (according to a letter he wrote his half-brother in 1921) was Stella Lee. One day he was working on 1st west of Bellvue demolishing an old bank building so a woman could put up some garages. She brought out some ice cold lemonade because it was very hot. Thomas was almost 70 years old at the time. He drank too much and had a stroke. He never fully recouperated. He went to live with his daughter, Annie Lee, in Pacoima after that. He died there of pneumonia. Annie chose Grandview Cemetary in Glendale because it was so pretty.

Research: No grave marker - Grave 8, Lot 107, Section H at Grandview Cemetary. Thomas' death certificate and his daughter, Annie's, indicate he was in Los Angeles from 1883. However, his wife's death certificate would indicate they came in 1887. Ruth Walker's genealogy shows him born 21 May 1854 - however she has the wrong date for his death.

Tom sold his homestead by May, 1906 to the Chapman family.

Tom lived with daughter Annie Lee in 1910. 
Mendenhall, Thomas Nathan (I1656)
 
171 A Harry E. Lee appears near a Charles Henry Kane in Belton, Bell Co., Texas in 1920. Kane lists his father as born in Ireland. It seems likely this is Harry.

There is a marriage 6 Sept 1924 in Los Angeles Co., CA between Frances M. Gladney to Harry E. Lee. His parents are John H. Lee and Mary Catherine Beetle. Harry was 27 and Frances was 23. California County Marriages, 1850-1952. 
Lee, Harry Ernest (I6457)
 
172 A James Bishir appears as a store clerk in Fayette, Iowa in 1880. There is a James W. Bishir, born in Ohio, in the 1900 census for Des Moines, Iowa. His birth date is Jan 1857, however. He also appears in the city registry for 1897. He is married to Irene, b. Jan 1859 in IL, and has one child: Ernest, b. Sep 1882. J. W. Bishir is listed with his brother, Arthur A, in 1910 in Des Moines. No sign of his wife and children. He appears with wife Ida in 1905, Des Moines Ward 1. He is widowed by 1920, 1925 and 1930, living alone in Des Moines, Iowa. Bishir, James W. (I1401)
 
173 A James Byshire is living with the family in Clark, Clinton Co., Ohio in 1870. Probably this is Piety’s brother, James. Or is this the son of Jonathan? Turner, James (I2712)
 
174 A John Bishir is listed as serving in the Spanish/American War in 1898/99. He enlisted on Nov 22, 1898 and was discharged while at sea on Nov 21, 1901. His age is about right for this Jonathan. He is serving with Company F (Hillsboro), 3rd Ohio Vol. Inf. and was mustered out as a Sgt.

It appears that 1st Sgt Bisher was also sent to Mexico on the eve of World War I.

A military record exists for a John Bishir who was born at almost exactly (to the month) the same time as this Jonathan. He lists his birthplace as Lynchburg, Ohio and his residence as Monterey, California. His military record is as follows:

Co M 6 Infantry to 16 June 1917; Co M 53 Infantry to 3 Oct 1918; Army Candidate School Langres to 18 Nov 1918; 331 Infantry to 2 Apr 1919; Co M 53 Infantry to Discharge Corporal 1 June 1917; Private, first class 20 Jan 1917; Sergeant 14 July 1917; 1 Sergeant 27 Dec 1917; 1 Sergeant 1 Sept 1919. Defensive Sector. American Expeditionary Forces July 6/8 to 12 June 1919. Honorable discharge 15 Dec 1919.

John appears in 1910 with the 21st Infantry at Ludlow Barracks, Camp Keithley in Mindanao, the Phillipines. In 1920, he appears at Camp Grant, in Illinois. 
Bishir, Jonathan (I1494)
 
175 A marriage exists for Dec 25, 1874 for Elizabeth Willett to Sylvester N. Smith in Highland Co., Ohio. Another exists for Aug 21, 1880 for Elizabeth Willett to Perry R. Hiestand in Highland Co., Ohio. Willett, Elizabeth (I5765)
 
176 A marriage exists for Rachel E. Willett to Charles P. Sanders, 15 Feb 1866 in Highland Co., Ohio. Willett, Rachel (I5767)
 
177 A marriage record exists for April 3, 1889 for Annie N. Willett to John P. Griffith, Highland Co., Ohio. Willett, Annie (I3469)
 
178 A Mary Bescher is listed as a servant in the 1860 census in Brooklyn, NY. Birth information matches. Bisher, Mary (I5613)
 
179 A Miss Mary W. Bishir is listed in the 1905 Topeka, Kansas census.

Mary was found dead in her shack, the apparent victim of a murder.

——

The Topeka Daily Capital (Topeka, KS)
Wed, Jan 2, 1907, pg 8

MYSTERY SURROUNDS HER DEATH
Body of Miss Mary Bisher Found.
She Had Been Dead for Some Time.
AUTOPSY WILL BE HELD
Question as to Caus of Ending.
Had Been Threatened a Number of Times.

Although no arrests have follwed the finding of the body of Miss Mary Bischer in an outbuilding in Highland Park yesterday at 11 o’clock, officers have a clue and if anything is found by the autopsy which shows that the woman died from other than natural causes, arrests will probably follow at once. From half a dozen persons is heard the story of how Miss Bischer has told of abuse and threadts at the hands of a man whose name is known to the police. The officers have also learned that he was absent from home during the past three or four days and while they do not say that arrests will be made today, Coroner Keith said last night that he would make no arrests until after the autopsy, which is taken to mean that arrests may be made.

There are no marks that could be seen yesterday on the body of the woman but the body was in such a state of decomposition that marks would not be visible, according to the officers. While it is rumored that the woman had large sums of money hidden about the house or rather the place, not one cent was found by the officers who searched the place yesterday.

Miss Bischer is reported to have feared an attempt on her life, but whether or not it was because she kept money about her is not known. She slept in a woodshed near the house, it is said, because she believed she was safer there than she would be if she slept in the house, as in case anyone had designs upon her life they would look for her in the house rather than in the woodshed.

When found, her hands and face lay on the side of an improvised bed, constructed of pine and oak plank, sections of board fence and other lumber. Her knees and feet rested on the floor, and from her position might have died while at prayer. Her feet were bare, but as if to refute this statement that she died at prayer, her hair was smoothly combed. It is reasoned that she had been preparing for bed as her bare feet would indicate, her hair would have been loose, or at least, not tightly combed as it was when she was found. She is nearly 70 years old.

The shed in which she was found is a small affair, 6x8 feet in dimensions. Rubbish of every description was found stored away in the “shack” and it was plainly the habitation of a recluse. Seven pocket-books containing almost everything but money were found. Eighteen market baskets hung on the wall. Old clothing, rags and papers were found on every hand. The woman cooked, ate and slept in the shed. In one of the baskets was found a letter from a sister which was from a small Missouri town and was dated 1868. In another place was found a bit of paper in which the writer said that she would have had three stiff fingers had she not been treated by Miss Bisher. This was dated 1897. Junk of every description was found in the shed.

From various sources it was told yesterday that Miss Bisher had trouble with the persons in question. Last Fourth of July she called at the county jail and told Deputy Sheriff Lawson that she didn’t know what to do as she feared for her life. The man in question, she said had threatened her life many times and had caused her a great deal of trouble. Lately she said he had grown more troublesome and persistent in his demands to which she said she could not comply.

An unknown woman who refused to give her name yesterday called up Dr. Keith and told him that a brother of the dead woman, Clifford Bisher, llived in Port Townsend, Washington. Dr. Keith telegraphed to the address last night but at a late hour he had received no reply. The woman who gave the information said that Miss Bisher had complained to her repeatedly of a man who the officers suspect and had said that he threatened to kill her. The woman refused to give her name, although Dr. Keith fairly begged her to do so. He said that she did not want to be mixed up in the affair.

Miss Bisher came from near Eskridge in 1901. Dow Busenpark of Eskridge, said of her over long distance telephone last night: “She has not been here since about 1901. I didn’t know a great deal about her save that she was peculiar in manner and did not seem to get along well with her neighbors. She owned a farm near town valued at $3,500 and a small house in town.”

Besides her Wabaunsee county property Miss Bisher owned property in Highland Park, besides the property where she was found. It is said that she owns property on the West Side. She is also said to have once owned property up the North Side.

The body of MIss Bisher was discovered yesterday morning by Mrs. G. H. Boyer, a neighbor, who, not having seen signs of life about the Bisher place for sometime, feared that something was wrong with the woman, and, taking with her a boy, went to the shed. The door was found open and Miss Bisher in the position described above.

Near where she was found lay a bank book showing that $11 had been deposited in the Bank of Topeka.

An autopsy will be held over the remains this morning at 8:30 o’clock at Shellabarger’s undertaking rooms, by Dr. Keith and in case the slightest sign of foul play, or any evidence tending to show that Miss Bishir died anything but a natural death, is discovered, arrests will likely follow. 
Bishir, Mary W (I3928)
 
180 A news article from 1949 reports the loss by fire of the Vanderzyl grain elevator in Prarie City, Iowa, belonging to George Vanderzyl. Vanderzyl, George Irwin (I5872)
 
181 A number of stories were passed down to Ruth Walker about the Lavina and her family. The boys of the family were a "devilish" bunch. Their sisters wore long dresses with aprons and, when the boys got too bad, they would grab them and throw their aprons over the boys' heads and make them think they were about to be smothered "to death." So they would beg for mercy and be good for a while after that. The brothers also loved to play jokes on each other and their mother. One day Lavina moved the beds to different places in the room. Tom didn't know it but Will and John did. That night they bet Tom they could jump into bed before he did. They all made a run for it but, of course, Will and John landed in bed and brother Tom hit the floor like a ton of bricks. He was so angry he gave them a good going over for it. Lavina always smoked a stone clay pipe. One day the boys, Tom, Will, John and Edd, got her pipe and put a grain of powder in the bottom and the tobbaco on top. So there sat Lavina, puffing away. The boys got near the door. Soon the tobbaco burned down to the powder and exploded. She just about hit the ceiling and, of course, the boys hit the door running - their mother after them. Willey had a homspun coat his mother made for him pocket in it. He had a cow's horn which called the dogs and made a loud noise in general. One day they were out burning brush and Willey had laid his coat on the ground. The grass caught fire and the coat burned. Tom and John said, "Willey, did it all burn?" He tearfully said, "Yes. All but the horn!" They thought this quite funny. Around 1867 when her second husband died Lavina's farm (called the "lower 80 acres" near Gentry Cut) was found to have coal on it. Somehow she was cheated out of the land (or sold out for far less than it was worth) and went to live with her son, John. Lavina was very religious - she was a Presbyterian. She would "get shouting happy at times." Things were tough for Lavina later in life. Her three daughters all died of Tuberculosis within two years of each other. She nursed them throughout. In 1888, she broke her leg when a team of mules ran away and threw her out of a wagon. She later died from it. Harkey, Eliza Lavina (I1313)
 
182 A Samuel Watts is in Marion Twp, Saline Co., Missouri in 1840:

one male (5-9)
one male (10-14)
one male (20-29)
one male (40-49)
one female (10-14)
one female (15-19)
one female (20-29)
one female (40-49).

Also in 1840 in Franklin Twp., Howard Co., MO, Samuel Watts:

one male (20-29) [too young to have been our Saml Watts]
one female (20-29)
6 slaves

In 1850:

Jos Watts (age 40, b VA)
Milly Watts (age 35, b VA)
Saml Watts (age 18)
Thos Watts (age 11)
Eliza Watts (age 8)
N Watts (age 7)
Walter Watts (age 5)
Martha J Watts (age 3)
Martha Watts (age 80, b. Virginia) [she seems too old to have been Samuel’s widow]

In 1870 in Boon’s Lick Twp., Howard Co., Missouri:

Samuel Watts (age 58, born in Virginia) [probably too young to be our Saml Watts]
Maria (age 23)
Louisa (age 8)
John (age 6)

In 1880 in Boon’s Lick Twp., Howard Co., Missouri:

Samuel Watts (age 67, born in Virginia)
Mary A. (wife) (age 39, b in Missouri)
John (stepson) (age 15, b in Missouri)

(next door in 1880 is William Watts, age 37 and family)

----

From Howard Co., Missouri Marriages:

Watts, Samuel    Reynolds, Susan     10 Feb 1854      3     220
Watts, Samuel    Cox, Mary A.        16 June 1878     4     287
Watts, Samuel    Tinsley, Charlott Mariah 19 April 1865 4    56 
Watts, Samuel (I7576)
 
183 A Serena Hardesta is living as a 55 year-old servant in the household of Simion and Manerva Arnold in Green Twp., Clinton Co., Ohio in 1880.

Nov 1, 1877, Clinton Republican newspaper:
A substantial surprise was given Mrs. Serena Hardesty, a worthy, but poor christian woman, of Wayne township, one day last week. Supporting her little family as best she could, and that but scantily, the neighbors concluded to give her a helping hand. Gathering together, they proceeded to a grove near her home and set a large table and filled it with the good things of the land. While this was going on the men, with axes, fell too, and chopped up eighteen or twenty cords of wood, which (after she had been invited out to take dinner with them) was hauled to her humble home. Provisions of all kinds were also taken, and the old lady made to feel that she was still in a christian land.
[provided by Christine Royster, chrisroyster@urec.net]

RESEARCH NOTES: Cyrena is listed as “Susan” in 1860. 
Griffin, Cyrena (or Sirena) (I573)
 
184 A William Lee is listed in 1830 in Howard Co., Missouri (aged 40-50) with 3 boys (1 under 5, 2 that are 15-20) and 4 girls (2 5-10, 2 10-15) and a wife (30-40). (8 slaves) So it’s clear there are more children than we knew about. John Jones lives next door and William Watts is nearby.

William is probably brother to John and Joel, son of William Lee Sr. It seems likely that the son WIlliam is William G. Lee who married Elizabeth Fuggit and traveled to California.

William Lee (1774-1833) died in the 1833 cholera outbreak along with 3 other of the Lee men in his brother, John Lee’s family. There is a probate administration assignment in 1833 in which John’s probate administration is restated without William. We have found evidence that William’s widow, Mary Polly (nee Cassady), died around 1835. Both husband and wife died intestate (no will). Following her death, on 6 Jan 1836 John Jones, David Lee, Thomas Lee, John Spurgeon, James Daily and John Harvey were appointed joint administrators of William’s estate. David and Thomas are William and Mary Polly’s eldest sons. John Jones is his son-in-law. In January 1837 Jones auctioned off 9 negro slaves from the estate on the courthouse steps. The estate, amounting to $3978.23, is divided among nine heirs, each receiving $442.02. Shortly thereafter (Nov 1836), the two youngest (under 14) children of William and Mary Polly, William and Malinda, were assigned to Reuben and William Watts respectively as their guardians. We believe this is evidence that William G. Lee of Tulare Co., California, whose bio indicated he was raised by a “Mr. Waite” in Missouri, is, in fact, the son of William and Mary Polly Lee. George Washington and William lived next door to one another in Tulare, California in 1870. If Washington had been W.G.’s brother, he would have been of-age when his parents died. So there is no guardian assignment for him. (Of course, the two could have been 1st cousins if Washington was Joel’s son instead). 
Lee, William (I7667)
 
185 A “Madorah Redmon” age 25 appears by herself as a boarder in Bakersfield, Kern Co., California in the 1880 census. She lists her parents born in Missouri and Texas (neither of which matches our Medora/Bedora’s parents’ birthplaces). She lists both her parents born in Ohio on her second marriage record. Morris, Madora Florence (I9848)
 
186 Abbie lived in the Atoka District, Choctaw Nation, Waco, Texas, and Fort Worth, Texas. Baty, Abbie Elmina (I2190)
 
187 Abbrev: "Marriage Records of Berkeley Co., Virginia 1781-1854" Book1b
Title: "Marriage Records of Berkeley Co., Virginia 1781-1854" Book1b
Page: pg. 21 
Family F1225
 
188 Abbrev: Adams County, Ohio Marriages, Book 3 (1819-1833)
Title: Adams County, Ohio Marriages, Book 3 (1819-1833)
Page: Pg. 72 
Family F1873
 
189 Accidently run over by water tank. Bishir, William Dale (I739)
 
190 According to a biography, John’s second wife was Mary Bailey - however in the 1850 census a Sarah is listed as his wife. Sarah Bailey (I7601)
 
191 According to church records, Melchior was buried with his son Hartmann on 13 Mar 1694. Herrche, Melchior (I2621)
 
192 According to her mother’s obituary, Virginia and her husband lived in Seattle in 1935. The 1940 census confirms this and that they were living there in 1940. However, their children we born in California in 1936 and 1939. Reed, Virginia (I10082)
 
193 According to Joan (mattybfam@aol.com) Glenna stayed in Monticello area. Wright, Glenda (I4340)
 
194 According to Ruth Walker, her Uncle John, believing he was German, was "for Germany, tooth and toe nail." During the first world war, he was against the U.S. and strictly for Germany.
Research: 1900 census shows John's birthdate as Jan 1849. 
Mendenhall, John Robert (I1324)
 
195 According to the 1910 census, George arrived in the U.S. in 1849. Baker, George William (I4087)
 
196 According to the article from White Co. Democrat (a weekly newspaper), Ransom was a doctor and a circuit riding preacher.

- - - - - - - - - -
White County Democrat October 29, 1909
Celebrated Golden Wedding Anniversary
Mr. and Mrs. Gilmore of Sleeth, were visiting and Chalmers a few days last week, and on Saturday at the home of Mrs. Lee Davisson (their daughter) they celebrated the golden anniversary of their wedding.
Those of their children who were present were: William Gilmore of Swayze; Mrs. Morton Mahin; Mrs. Lee Davisson; Mrs. Will Cowger and Mrs. Wallace Ward of Chalmers. They are only grandchild, the little son of Mrs. Tillman Lucas, of Chalmers was also present.
Mrs. Gilmore is a daughter of Jeremiah Bishir, one of the pioneers of White County-and for many years lived about four miles south of Monticello.
- - - - - - - - - -
1920 with William and Effie Gilmore Cowger and family

- - - - - - - - - - -
obituary Monticello Herald 31 August 1922
Ransom Thomas Gilmore
One of the County's Oldest Citizens Passed Away at Home of Daughter In Chalmers

Ransom Thomas Gilmore, one of the county's oldest residents, passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. W. D. Cowger in Chalmers Sunday afternoon about 4 o'clock following an illness of some duration. Mr. Gilmore was 90 years of age and had lived in White County many years. He was a minister of the gospel for many years and also studied medicine, practicing a short time while a young man. Later in life he gave up the ministry and engaged in farming.
Mr. Gilmore was born in Sandusky County Ohio, July 8, 1832. He was united in marriage to Melinda Bishir, near Monticello, October 23, 1859, and to this union eight children were born, all of whom survive. They are Thomas Gilmore of Santa Anna, California; Jeremiah Gilmore of Monticello; William Gilmore of Swayzee; Mrs. Charles Hart of Indianapolis; Mrs. John Lucas of Lowell; Mrs. E. M. Mahin, Mrs. L.F. Davisson and Mrs. W. D. Cowger of Chalmers. There were 22 grandchildren and six great grandchildren.
The deceased united with the United Brethren church when a young man and soon after began preaching the gospel he continued with the ministry for several years, later engaging in farming preaching only occasionally. His wife, who had been his companion and helper perso many years, passed away August 6, 1919. The funeral was held from the home of Mrs.Cowger, Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock and in permits was made any Chalmers Cemetery.
- - - - - - - - - -
[bishir3.FTW]

According to the article from White Co. Democrat (a weekly newspaper), Ransom was a doctor and a circuit riding preacher.

- - - - - - - - - -
White County Democrat October 29, 1909
Celebrated Golden Wedding Anniversary
Mr. and Mrs. Gilmore of Sleeth, were visiting and Chalmers a few days last week, and on Saturday at the home of Mrs. Lee Davisson (their daughter) they celebrated the golden anniversary of their wedding.
Those of their children who were present were: William Gilmore of Swayze; Mrs. Morton Mahin; Mrs. Lee Davisson; Mrs. Will Cowger and Mrs. Wallace Ward of Chalmers. They are only grandchild, the little son of Mrs. Tillman Lucas, of Chalmers was also present.
Mrs. Gilmore is a daughter of Jeremiah Bishir, one of the pioneers of White County-and for many years lived about four miles south of Monticello.
- - - - - - - - - -
1920 with William and Effie Gilmore Cowger and family

- - - - - - - - - - -
obituary Monticello Herald 31 August 1922
Ransom Thomas Gilmore
One of the County's Oldest Citizens Passed Away at Home of Daughter In Chalmers

Ransom Thomas Gilmore, one of the county's oldest residents, passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. W. D. Cowger in Chalmers Sunday afternoon about 4 o'clock following an illness of some duration. Mr. Gilmore was 90 years of age and had lived in White County many years. He was a minister of the gospel for many years and also studied medicine, practicing a short time while a young man. Later in life he gave up the ministry and engaged in farming.
Mr. Gilmore was born in Sandusky County Ohio, July 8, 1832. He was united in marriage to Melinda Bishir, near Monticello, October 23, 1859, and to this union eight children were born, all of whom survive. They are Thomas Gilmore of Santa Anna, California; Jeremiah Gilmore of Monticello; William Gilmore of Swayzee; Mrs. Charles Hart of Indianapolis; Mrs. John Lucas of Lowell; Mrs. E. M. Mahin, Mrs. L.F. Davisson and Mrs. W. D. Cowger of Chalmers. There were 22 grandchildren and six great grandchildren.
The deceased united with the United Brethren church when a young man and soon after began preaching the gospel he continued with the ministry for several years, later engaging in farming preaching only occasionally. His wife, who had been his companion and helper perso many years, passed away August 6, 1919. The funeral was held from the home of Mrs.Cowger, Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock and in permits was made any Chalmers Cemetery.
- - - - - - - - - -
[lori.FTW]

According to the article from White Co. Democrat (a weekly newspaper), Ransom was a doctor and a circuit riding preacher.

- - - - - - - - - -
White County Democrat October 29, 1909
Celebrated Golden Wedding Anniversary
Mr. and Mrs. Gilmore of Sleeth, were visiting and Chalmers a few days last week, and on Saturday at the home of Mrs. Lee Davisson (their daughter) they celebrated the golden anniversary of their wedding.
Those of their children who were present were: William Gilmore of Swayze; Mrs. Morton Mahin; Mrs. Lee Davisson; Mrs. Will Cowger and Mrs. Wallace Ward of Chalmers. They are only grandchild, the little son of Mrs. Tillman Lucas, of Chalmers was also present.
Mrs. Gilmore is a daughter of Jeremiah Bishir, one of the pioneers of White County-and for many years lived about four miles south of Monticello.
- - - - - - - - - -
1920 with William and Effie Gilmore Cowger and family

- - - - - - - - - - -
obituary Monticello Herald 31 August 1922
Ransom Thomas Gilmore
One of the County's Oldest Citizens Passed Away at Home of Daughter In Chalmers

Ransom Thomas Gilmore, one of the county's oldest residents, passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. W. D. Cowger in Chalmers Sunday afternoon about 4 o'clock following an illness of some duration. Mr. Gilmore was 90 years of age and had lived in White County many years. He was a minister of the gospel for many years and also studied medicine, practicing a short time while a young man. Later in life he gave up the ministry and engaged in farming.
Mr. Gilmore was born in Sandusky County Ohio, July 8, 1832. He was united in marriage to Melinda Bishir, near Monticello, October 23, 1859, and to this union eight children were born, all of whom survive. They are Thomas Gilmore of Santa Anna, California; Jeremiah Gilmore of Monticello; William Gilmore of Swayzee; Mrs. Charles Hart of Indianapolis; Mrs. John Lucas of Lowell; Mrs. E. M. Mahin, Mrs. L.F. Davisson and Mrs. W. D. Cowger of Chalmers. There were 22 grandchildren and six great grandchildren.
The deceased united with the United Brethren church when a young man and soon after began preaching the gospel he continued with the ministry for several years, later engaging in farming preaching only occasionally. His wife, who had been his companion and helper perso many years, passed away August 6, 1919. The funeral was held from the home of Mrs.Cowger, Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock and in permits was made any Chalmers Cemetery.
- - - - - - - - - - 
Gilmore, Ransom (I4315)
 
197 Adam’s will mentions a daugther, Mary. Taylor, Capt. Adam (I6268)
 
198 After death of her parents, lived with her half-sister, a Mrs. Bunch. Lillie was living in 1978 and may have been married. Talkington, Lillie Dir (I2042)
 
199 After graduating from Berkeley, Reginald worked for Standard Oil of California and in the 1930's became General Manager, then in the late 1930's he played an important role for Standard Oil to move forward in developing production in Saudi Arabia. He believed strongly that Standard should lead the way. Then in March of 1938 they had their first well, producing 1.580 barrels a day from 4.724 ft. Subsequently named the Arab Zone, the formation would become the main source of petroleum in Saudi Araba. He worked on a tight budget and his efforts proved to be the right move.

He was widowed in 1940 and was living with his children and his mother in Berkeley, California. 
Stoner, Reginald Carlyle (I10027)
 
200 After her husband died, Eudora lived in Visalia. Lindsey, Eudora L. (I7285)
 

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